SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS

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Kim-Kardashian-Dead-Keep-A-Child-Alive-Poster

Kim Kardashian is DEAD. The statement is shocking and it certainly caught my attention. But it isn’t a death notice – it’s part of the Digital Life Sacrifice campaign, which is aiming to raise money on World AIDS Day tomorrow for the Keep A Child Alive charity. It turns out that Kim and other celebrities, like Lady GaGa, Usher and Justin Timberlake, are only playing dead as they take part in a drive to raise $1million for Alicia Keys’ HIV and AIDS charity.

The idea behind the stunt is that various superstars will stop tweeting, updating and blogging until one million dollars is donated to the charity. In adverts to be aired tomorrow, the celebrities taking part are shown lying in coffins to represent their ‘digital deaths’.

I have to admire the thinking behind the Digital Life Sacrifice campaign. Not only does it combine the emotive worlds of celebrities and death, it does so in a singularly arresting way. Others, however, are rather less impressed. Reading comments on Twitter, it’s obvious that some see the stunt as yet another opportunity for self-important individuals to draw attention to themselves.

For many people, the news that a celebrity is ‘dead’ might raise nothing more than a shrug and a “so what?” Personally, I think Digital Life Sacrifice is a fantastic idea. It’s a superbly well-put-together campaign, offering a fresh take on social media initiatives – and I hope it does raise that million dollars for a wonderful cause, too.